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Posts Tagged ‘recipe’

Antioxidant Smoothie

In Nutrition, Recipe on March 30, 2013 at 2:17 am

This one is the halfway mark between the other two smoothies. Not nearly as grassy and chewy as the Green Smoothie but not quite as sweet and creamy as the Easy Smoothie. Wow, I’d have a really hard time selling ice to an Eskimo…

photoIngredients:
1 banana

1 cup frozen blueberries

1/4 avocado

1 TBSP almond butter

1 cup kale leaves

1 cup water

1 heaping TBSP hemp seeds

12oz = 294 kcals, 9g fat, 11g fiber(!), 8g protein.

High in vitamins A, C, & K. Good source of manganese, magnesium, potassium, and vitamins B6, riboflavin, & folate.

Easy Smoothie

In Nutrition, Recipe on March 23, 2013 at 4:15 pm

A balanced meal on it’s own, this smoothie is the perfect way to get much needed nutrients and calories into kids, athletes, and picky eaters. Packed with protein, healthy fats and hidden greens, it makes a nice meal replacement. I used pineapple for the smoothie pictured below which is why it’s so pale in color. Pineapple is a good choice for kids and picky eaters b/c its sweet, not seedy (like berries), and naturally contains enzymes which add digestion. However, if you are looking for the most nutritional value, I’d recommend frozen mixed berries.

Silken tofu, flax oil, and coconut milk make this vegan smoothie a perfect meal replacement.

Silken tofu, flax oil, and coconut milk make this vegan smoothie a perfect meal replacement.

Ingredients:

1 banana

3/4 cup frozen fruit

1/4 cup canned coconut milk

1/2 cup silken tofu

1 TBSP flax oil

2 handfuls of kale leaves

Add water to improve consistency as desired.

8oz = 203 kcals, 10g fat, 4.5g fiber, 7g protein. High in vitamins A, C, & K and omega-3 fatty acids. Good source of manganese, potassium, and copper.

Green Smoothie

In Nutrition, Recipe on March 23, 2013 at 3:45 pm

This drink may be a bit chunky if you don’t have a high speed blender but the flavor profile is still quite nice! The addition of raw, soaked cashews adds fat and protein making it a balanced meal that avoids blood sugar spikes. Place ingredients in blender in the order listed below for ease of blending. Comments from my neighbors, who are not regular green juice drinkers: “surprisingly refreshing” and “it kind of grows on you” hahahahaha

Mosty greens, a bit of fruit, and raw soaked cashews balance out this smoothie.

Mosty greens, a bit of fruit, and raw soaked cashews balance out this smoothie.

Ingredients:

2 chard leaves

2 kale leaves

1 cup parsley

1/2 cucumber – peeled, chopped

1/2 lemon – juiced

1/2 apple – peeled, cored, chopped

1/2 cup frozen mango

1/2 cup cashews – soaked

1 cup water

Makes about 16oz. Drink 1/2 in the morning and save the rest for an afternoon snack. Will keep for 1-2 days in fridge but tends to get thicker over time :/

8oz = 246 kcals, 12g fat, 5g fiber, 7g protein. Good source of vitamins A, C, & K, iron, phosphorus, manganese, copper, and magnesium.

To Juice or Not to Juice?

In Nutrition on March 20, 2013 at 4:00 am

Juicing, especially the uber-trendy juice cleanse, is all the rage these days. As a way to get a major download of nutrients into your diet, I say “carry on”. But I can’t endorse juicing as a meal replacement or an excuse to not eat an actual vegetable. I’ll be addressing cleansing in another post but for now lets discuss juicing as a supplement to our daily diet.

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Heavy on the greens. Easy on the beets and carrots. Cautious with the fruits.

Why is juicing beneficial?

For those of us in a disease or re-building state (i.e. cancer, surgery recovery, inflammatory bowel), juicing is crucial and amazingly restorative. For the rest of us, I believe juicing needs to be put in it’s proper place. Yes, juicing can concentrate nutrients and allow for increased absorption but it also removes an important nutrient when extracting the pulp and skin from the final product – fiber. Fiber regulates blood sugar, supports digestion, and lowers circulating blood cholesterol. If you are going to juice, be vigilant about getting your fiber from other sources. Additionally, the major nutrients extracted from most veggies are vitamins A, C, & K. Vitamins A & K are fat-soluble meaning they can only be absorbed into our bloodstream while bound to fat. So, eat a handful of nuts with that green juice. Vitamin C is extremely fragile and begins to degrade when exposed to light, heat, and oxygen! Therefore, cold-pressed juice consumed immediately is the most nutrient-dense option.

What to be mindful of when juicing.

Be sure to steer clear of fruit juice as it’s a sugar bomb and highly caloric (go easy on beets & carrots, too!). For green juices, consider adding in garlic or ginger and, for palatability, be sure to rely mostly on low sugar fruits such as apples, pears, berries, and lemons/limes in small doses. Lastly, consider the fact that drinking your calories does not trigger satiety the way a meal with fiber and fat does…you may find yourself consuming additional calories.

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Earthy, grassy, refreshing green juice.

If I don’t eat a balanced meal, it’s like I almost start to twitch. It’s really uncomfortable and I’m not in therapy for it. As a result, I tend to rely more heavily on smoothies b/c they retain the fiber and I can add in healthy fats (avocado, flax oil, chia, coconut milk) and protein (hemp, tofu, nut butters). There are a TON of juice and smoothie recipes on the web. In choosing a healthy one, carefully evaluate the amount of fruit the recipe relies on, and then let your creativity run wild!